Tony in the Philippines!

In the next episode of Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations, we get to see a sensitive side of Tony. He recognizes his large Filipino audience and that the Philippines is a country and food culture that he really wants ‘to do right by.’

You may recognize one of his hosts while there, Augusto, a runner up from the Fan-atic special, which aired last season. Although Augusto wasn’t picked, he made an impression on Tony, and in turn, he is treated to a reunion with his family and ‘the best pig…ever’ at a spectacularly large cookout.

He also delves deep into what exactly it means to be Filipino by exploring their history and the many prominent cultures of the islands. He travels to Manila, Pampanga, and Cebu, visiting a dampa and dining on adobo shrimp, sisig, crab (keep a look out for the stuffed crab – I almost booked a ticket immediately!), goat heads soup, ox tail and of course, lechon.

I know I say this every time, but don’t watch hungry!

Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Philippines airs on Monday, February 16 at 10pm EST on the Travel Channel.

Here’s a sneak preview video.


Comments

Tony in the Philippines! — 32 Comments

  1. I’m a Filipino and also a big fan of Anthony Bourdain. I was so proud when I heard that he was coming here to the Philippines to experience Filipino food at it’s finest (street foods are the best here!). Can’t wait to see this episode! More power to you! :D

  2. Thanks for the heads up. I got to spend a few months working in the Philippines a while back. It was a fascinating country, and the food was outstanding. Can’t wait to see Anthony Bourdain’s take on it.

  3. Maybe we just have bad Filipino restaurants here, but when I’ve looked in the windows at the food displays, it was a definite turn-off. One particularly memorable dish looked like piranha skeletons in curry sauce.

  4. Ahhh the PI… nothing like stumbling out of a bar at 3:00am and buying 100 pesos worth of freshly cooked monkey meat and don’t worry I’m pretty sure I tipped the vendor 20%.

  5. Being in New Mexico we don’t have much opportunity to try Filipino cuisine. Although, when I worked at a local newspaper we have a gentleman that was married to a beautiful woman who hailed from there. She used to bring us lunch all the time and I fell in love with her cooking.

    I love Mr. Bourdain because he’s not afraid to try local hang outs and find out where the truly AUTHENTIC cusine is located.

  6. #13Dank

    um… monkey?

    omg. how can you eat monkey? they look way too human. I would never ever ever ever ever eat monkey.
    I can’t imagine killing one.
    I don’t eat any meat anyway, but oh man… a monkey with their human like features. no way.

  7. I used to really like your blog, when I discovered it in 2007 I read it back from the archives, and even bought your book when it came out (even though it was pretty much the same stuff that was in the blog) and didn’t really regret spending money on it but lately, this blog just isn’t interesting anymore. I’m glad you were able to write your way out of waiting tables, but what your blog popular and good was the way you captured the tendencies of the industry at the people in it, the customers, the cooks, etc. The daily fresh observations about the things we see everyday captured the essence of the restaurant industry and made the monotony bearable and your blog interesting reading. However, it was your way of writing your observations about restaurant life, no holds barred, that made you popular and successful, and the blog has really gone downhill sense then. Every time I view it, it is either a promo for another book, tv show, product or something, or your observations (which at times seem to be almost hurtfully condescending and smug) of the industry from the other side now that you are no longer working in the trenches on a daily basis and it is almost as if you have become one of the customers mentioned in your stories. Don’t let the price of your success be the passion that made you successful in the first place.

  8. Deena… (hehehe) The streets surrounding the US Military bases in the PI were lined with Bars and filled with Street Vendors selling all sorts of gastronomic treats/time bombs. One of the most popular vendors would be a guy with a hibachi grill set up on cart and he would be cooking some type of bamboo skewered meat. Given the vast number of monkeys in the out lying jungles surrounding cities such as Olongapo, Angeles, Cebu… we as rowdy drunken Sailors chose to perpetuate the story/lie we had been told… ‘it was monkey meat’. In all likelihood it was strips of pork but honestly we really didn’t know its origin.

    Here is a link for the Americanized version of “Monkey Meat”

    http://www.recipezaar.com/Monkey-Meat-176933

  9. I disagree. I think your writing is still right on but like long time reader I don’t like the Anthony Bourdain stuff or the posts that let us know where you will be appearing in New Jersey or Pennsylvania. Now if you were going to be in the Detroit area I would want you to post about that! My daughter asked me last night if I was done with your book and I told her not yet. Actually I plan to buy it for her because she has really enjoyed what she has read of your blog. She is a bartender and has seen a lot of life from behind that bar.

  10. Deena… (hehehe) The streets surrounding the US Military bases in the PI were lined with Bars and filled with Street Vendors selling all sorts of gastronomic treats/time bombs. One of the most popular vendors would be a guy with a hibachi grill set up on cart and he would be cooking some type of bamboo skewered meat. Given the vast number of monkeys in the out lying jungles surrounding cities such as Olongapo, Angeles, Cebu… we as rowdy drunken Sailors chose to perpetuate the story/lie we had been told… ‘it was monkey meat’. In all likelihood it was strips of pork but honestly we really didn’t know its origin.

    Recipezaar has an Americanized version of ‘Monkey Meat’ using pork steak
    Monkey-Meat-176933

  11. I’ve yet to see that episode featuring the Philippines but im glad u did because we have so many palatable dishes around here. and yes, we may have the best street food but make sure it’s clean, or better yet, put a BI on the vendor.hahahaha!

  12. The Phillipines is beautiful and the people are very nice, but watch out for Manila. It’s like all the crooked taxi drivers and other crooks in the whole country are attracted there and they know a nonnative ‘sucker’ when they see one.

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  14. I grew up in the Philippines and loved the food there. I was not able to watch this episode but hope Bourdain does justice to the delicious food there. I was able to watch Andrew Zimmern’s show on the Philippines and thought that some it was well done. He had some balut and “dirty” ice cream too. I was not crazy about the coconut larvae though but thought the other featured dishes were good.

  15. I’m from the Philippines and I work as a server here in the U.S. Whenever someone asks me about Filipino food I always like to make a joke about cats and dogs hahahahaha. It’s nice to know that our food is good for tv and people get a clearer idea of what it’s like there.=)

  16. I am from the Philippines and work as a server here in the UP When someone asks me to Filipino food I always want to joke about cats and dogs hahahahaha. It ‘nice to know that the food is good TV, and people get a clearer understanding of what is . =)

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